The Piano Playlist Book Tag

Hello friends! I hope you are doing well and having a great week so far.

Before we jump into this wonderful book tag that I’m very excited about, a quick lil’ life update…

I know I haven’t posted in a few weeks, but I’m not sure I can promise consistent posts. For now, I will try to post once a month. It’s less than I’m used to, but at this time I’m hoping for quality over quantity. School and my extracurriculars have been keeping me busy but fulfilled!

But now let’s dive in! When I heard of the Piano Playlist Book Tag, I knew I had to do it. It combined two of my great loves—piano and books! And the prompts are so creative and fitting. For this tag, I decided to talk about books that I haven’t talked about as frequently on my blog. So please, sit back, relax, and enjoy the show!

Rules:

  • Post the rules in your post.
  • Answer all the questions and if you’ve never heard any of the songs, listen to them before you answer the questions.
  • Link the creator and the person who nominated you (Moi @ Bookish Blunders).
  • Nominate 8 people. Only 8. (Why? There’s no Symphony no. 9)

Prompts:

  • Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata: A book you read that had an unexpected plot twist near the end
  • Liszt – La Campanella: A book that you couldn’t even finish
  • Rimsky-Korsakov – Flight of the Bumblebee: A book that was so crazy and chaotic that you couldn’t even figure out what was happening
  • Mozart – Rondo Alla Turca: A book that is so over-recommended (it’s still good, though)
  • Beethoven – Für Elise: A book that has been one of your favourites for ages
  • Chopin – Fantaisie-Impromptu: A book that is high up on your to be read list
  • Beethoven – Sonata No. 17 “Tempest” 3rd Movement: A book that you love but isn’t that well-known
  • Mozart – Eine Kleine Nachtmusik: A book that is extremely long, but you still like it
  • Debussy – Clair De Lune: A book that was wonderful from start to finish

Beethoven — Moonlight Sonata: A book you read that had an unexpected plot twist near the end

The Westing Game is such a smart mystery, and considering how the book built up and prepared me for something, the ending came in and swept the rug out from under me. I actually had to reread the last chapter quite a bit, and it took a while before the twist finally sunk in and clicked. I don’t want to say too much without spoiling but if you’re looking for a book with secrets, mansions, and multiple multiple points of view, you may consider The Westing Game!

Liszt — La Campanella: A book that you couldn’t even finish

A while ago, I read Piranesi, but I eventually didn’t finish it. The concept was intriguing but the pacing was drawn out to the point I knew it was intentional. Sigh…one day, will I discover what happened to the House and all the Statues, or the lonely Banister? (okay I don’t think the banister was actually in the book)

Rimsky-Korsakov — Flight of the Bumblebee: A book that was so crazy and chaotic that you couldn’t even figure out what was happening

Maybe this doesn’t really count as “crazy” or “chaotic”, but I have very mixed feelings about The Starless Sea. On one hand, it got me out of a reading slump and at some points, I really enjoyed what I felt while reading it…if that makes sense? But on the other hand, the second half got a bit tangled, rushing forward while meandering at the same time, and nothing was explicitly stated. The story itself is very poetic with interesting and beautiful imagery, but that’s just it. The atmosphere itself is the most compelling—the characters and the plot were pale in comparison. What can I say? A book can’t survive on atmosphere alone!

Mozart — Rondo Alla Turca: A book that is so over-recommended (it’s still good, though)

Pride and Prejudice. Of course, I really enjoyed it, and for me, it’s been one of the most impactful books. But I am aware that it gets almost “over-recommended”. In addition to possibly being Austen’s most famous work, it’s also constantly recommended on lists of top classics.

Beethoven — Für Elise: A book that has been one of your favorites for ages

I just have to go with Anne of Green Gables. The characters, the setting, the plot, the wholesome and really impactful themes…every time I revisit it, I remember what truly loving a book feels like!

Chopin — Fantasie-Impromptu: A book that is high up on your to be read list

The Order of Time! I really want to find the time to read it, and take the time to let it sink in. I’ve started it before, and the prose is just so lyrical while remaining scientific! It’s one of those books that I just need the time and space to read, because there are a lot of biG ideas I am anticipating from it.

Beethoven — Sonata No. 17 “Tempest” 3rd Movement: A book that you love but isn’t that well known

That would probably be Alice and Bob Meet the Wall of Fire. It’s a collection of truly insightful and interesting pieces from Quanta Magazine, and covers certain topics in biology, physics, and machine learning in an engaging and accessible way!

Mozart — Eine Kleine Nachtmusik: A book that is extremely long, but you still like it.

While Emma is not really a tome, it’s still on the longer end, and it felt even longer when I was reading it. I still enjoyed it, of course, but I had to push through in some sections. Obviously Austen built the “mundaneness” of Emma’s town really nicely, through conversations and manners, but it got a bit much at times (although that could also be because I was trying to read as quickly as possible without missing anything, as it happens when you read interesting books).

Debussy — Clair de Lune: A book that was wonderful from start to finish

I’ll go with The Phantom Tollbooth for this one! The worldbuilding is so creative and unique, and the diction and illustrations made the reading experience even more “alive”. I especially liked the part about symphony music creating the dawn and dusk of the day 😀

And…that’s a wrap!

Thank you so much for reading! I hope you enjoyed this post, and in the comments below, let me know how you’re doing and what books you would pair with these songs. Have a wonderful rest of your day…

5 Comments

    1. Haha although I wouldn’t say no to a P&P reading at school 😀 I don’t know if you’ve read Persuasion by Jane Austen but I remember that while it had that kind of “classic” language, it was really good and I found it easy to follow along! Aw thank you for reading!!

      Liked by 2 people

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